Hidden Drawer Locking Mechanism Plans

Hidden Drawer in Bookcase Plans For Sale

If you’re here, you’ve probably seen my YouTube videos on the hidden drawer mechanism incorporated in my featured project bookcase. Now, take a look behind the scenes at the drawings and sketches used to create this project.

Includes:

  • Preliminary shop sketches of the drawer locking mechanism
  • CAD drawings in PDF format
  • Specifications and Dimensions for Components

Price: $8.99

Files available for download immediately after you purchase.

Hidden Drawer Locking Mechanism Plans

How the Hidden Mechanical Locking Mechanism Works

The hand-crafted custom bookcase requires you pull open each of the visible drawers, before a hidden control springs out and allows you to trigger the secret compartment built into what looks like a normal molding.

To make things more complex, each of the drawers must be pulled out to a certain point before the latches they control slide out of the way, similar to how the pins in a regular lock work. That finally allows a length of wooden dowel to slide out – hidden, normally, as a knot in the wood itself – and when you twist it and then push it back in, a cable tracked around the back of the cabinet allows the hidden drawer to spring out.

CNC – Mr. & Mrs. Smith Doors [Video]

We knew we wanted to make a big impact with this kitchen. This video showcases the final product of our collaborative efforts.

The builder I did this kitchen for and I both have a design forward approach and are really passionate about what we do.  These projects are always a lot of fun to work on.

This house is the second of two custom homes in the new 12 lot development in historic St. Paul’s Crocus Hill neighborhood.

The custom CNC grid doors were originally inspired by the house in Mr. & Mrs. Smith.  (The Closet and Master Bath in that house are also amazing, check it out next time you watch the movie.  You know what I’m talking about Rick.)

The question was, what’s the best way to make custom grids like the ones in these doors?  That is where Mike Prom and Tyler Cooper came in.  After Chris and I had the concept for this kitchen polished up, Mike and I started designing the doors and toe kicks using parametric modeling software and go-to-meeting.

Mike is a superhero when it comes to CAD.  He has been helping me out with drafting and design work from the very beginning.  Mike is awesome.

Tyler Cooper is one of the owners at Nordeast Makers.  Cooper and his business partner Micah have become my go-to source for contract CNC work.  In addition to the CNC router, they also have a laser cutter, and multiple 3D printers.

The best projects that I work on are always a collaboration between multiple creative minds working towards the same end goal.

Below are some images of the finished project.

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CNC Quater Sawn White Oak X-Grid Doors

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Screenshot from my online design session with CAD Superhero Mike Prom.  

Glueing up #MiteredDoor blanks for the #CNC router @NordEastMakers.

A photo posted by Brian Grabski (@briangrabski) on

Working late tonight on the #cnc @nordeastmakers.

A video posted by Brian Grabski (@briangrabski) on

 

Craftsman-style home on West Lake of the Isles Parkway.  Featured in the 2014 Fall Parade of Homes.

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Linden Hills Bungalow – Parade of Homes #267

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Newly constructed custom home located in the heart of Linden Hills.   Featured in the 2015 Spring Parade of Homes. 

Crocus Hill Custom Kitchen

We knew we wanted to make a big impact with this kitchen. This video showcases the final product of our collaborative efforts.

The builder I did this kitchen for is also one of my best friends, and we both started our companies at the same time in 2005. Chris Van Klei and I both have a design forward approach and are really passionate about what we do.  It’s always really fun working together.  At times we tend to go a little overboard, which is why I believe we were able to survive in the down economy and come out on the other end working on projects like this one.

This particular project was a unique opportunity for the both of us to plant our flags.  This house is one of two custom homes in a new 12 lot development in historic St. Paul’s Crocus Hill neighborhood.  We were going to be working along side some big name builders and architects and with that in mind, the design process began.

Design concepts always start out as a sketch. This kitchen was modeled after a similar project I completed a year earlier.  The question was, how do we take this to a whole new level?  That is where Mike Prom came in.  Mike was the mastermind behind the uber complicated hidden drawer mechanism that I built back in  2010.

Mike is a CAD wizard with a background in mechanical engineering.  He has been helping me out a tun with drafting and design work since I got started.  Like Chris, Mike is also one of my best friends.  The best projects that I work on are always a collaboration between multiple creative minds working towards the same end goal.

After Chris and I had the concept for this kitchen polished up, Mike and I started designing the hood using parametric modeling software.

Mike lives in Portland and I live in Minneapolis, so we had to do our meetings together online using GoToMeeting.com.  Mike designed/modeled the hood and island legs using a CAD software called Inventor by Autodesk.  I was able to view his screen on my screen, and we were able to communicate though the microphone and speakers built into our computers.  Together we spent several nights collaborating on how we wanted those parts to look and be constructed.

Here are some renderings showing the progression.

Hood_Rendering1

Hood_Rendering2

Hood_Rendering3

Hood_Rendering4

After we completed the design work, Mike put me in touch with a contact of his who runs the CNC at a nearby, large scale production wood shop.  We handed off the .dxf files to him and he nested the parts and routed everything out for us.

Leg_DrawingAfter that it was simply a matter of piecing everything together and filming time-lapses of the process.  All the parts were routed out of 3/4″ MDF.  I glued, screwed, bondo’ed and sanded up each section, working from the inside of the assembly outward.

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Legs_Assembled

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HoodTop

After the bones of the top section were assembled, I laminated the face with 3/8″ bending plywood.  These parts were also cut to the exact size and shape on the router, so all I had to do was line it up and screw it down.

BellTop1

After the glue dried, I puttied all the screw holes and edges with automotive bondo and sanded them flush.  The final step was to veneer over the bending plywood.  For this, I used paper backed veneer and contact adhesive.   I started with the sides, and finished with the face.  The applied molding was nailed on and I was finished.

BellTop2

We designed this hood to be easy to install.  There were two hangers built into the top section of the hood so it could be installed the same way you would install a cabinet.  We also designed the back sides of the legs to have voids so that cleats could be attached to the wall and nailed into through the sides of the legs.

Install

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